DBSP
Roster  DBSP Departments VA-MD Vet Med

DBSP Research Faculty

Dr. Aloka Bandara

Aloka Abey Bandara, PhD

Research Assistant Professor
Department of Biomedical Sciences & Pathobiology

e-mail: abandara@vt.edu


Education

1998 PhD Animal Sciences
Virginia Polytechnic Institute & State University
1989 MPhil Animal Sciences
University of Peradeniya
Sri Lanka
1985 BSc Agricultural Sciences
University of Peradeniya
Sri Lanka

Research Project Involvement

  1. Characterization of Pathogenicity of Burkholderia mallei, and Development of Live Vaccines Against Glanders
    -The importance of carobxyl-terminal protease, and lipopolysaccharide O-antigen to pathogenicity of B. mallei is being investigated.
    -A potential live vaccine candidate has been developed (the relevant patent disclosure is being reviewed).
    -This work is undertaken in collaboration with Drs. Steve Boyle, Gerhardt Schurig and Tom Inzana (from Virginia Tech), and Dr. David DeShazer (from the United States Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases).
  2. Characterization of Pathogenicity of Brucella, and Development of Live Vaccines Against Brucellosis
    –The roles of penicillin-binding proteins, outermembrane autotransporters, carobxyl-terminal protease, invasion proteins, and ureases in pathogenicity of Brucella are being investigated.
    -A live vaccine has been patented.
    -This work is undertaken in collaboration with Drs. Steve Boyle, Gerhardt Schurig and N. Sriranganathan (from Virginia Tech).
  3. Use of Nano-scale Optical Fiber Biosensors for Diagnosis of Infectious Diseases
    -Use of optical fiber biosensors in detecting and differentiating Burkholderia mallei, Burkholderia pseudomallei, and Francisella tularensis is being investigated.
    -Feasibility to use this approach to diagnose tuberculosis infections is being studied.
    -Dr. Bandara is a co-investigator of this project. Others investigators are Drs. Tom Inzana and Randy Heflin (from Virginia Tech).

Professional Experience

August 2004- Assistant Professor [Research]
Department of Biomedical Sciences and Pathobiology
Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University
Blacksburg, VA 24061-0342
2002-2003 Research Scientist
Department of Biomedical Sciences and Pathobiology
Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University
Blacksburg, VA 24061-0342
2000-2001 Postdoctoral Fellow
Department of Biomedical Sciences and Pathobiology
Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State
University, Blacksburg, VA 24061-0342

Professional Memberships

American Society for Microbiology

Patents

  1. United States patent US 7,364,745 B2 (April 29, 2008). DEVELOPMENT OF A LIVE, ATTENUATED, RECOMBINANT VACCINE. FOR BRUCELLOSIS. Inventors: Bandara, A.B., S.M. Boyle, N. Sriranganathan, and G.G. Schurig.
  2. Intellectual Property Disclosure - LIVE, ATTENUATED, RECOMBINANT VACCINE FOR Glanders (being reviewed by Virginia Tech office for Intellectual Property). Bandara, A.B., S.M. Boyle, CM Reilly, and G.G. Schurig.

Awards & Honors

  • Clearance from the US Federal Bureau of Investigation to use and handle category-A, B or C bio-threat agents for research purposes
  • Certification from Environmental and Safety Unit of Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University for handling, use and mailing of category-A, B or C bio-threat agents for research purposes
  • John Lee Pratt Nutritional Fellowship: (August 1994 to July 1997), to undertake Ph.D. studies at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University
  • Overseas Development Administration (of the United Kingdom) Fellowship: (August 1986 to August 1988), to undertake M. Phil. studies at University of Peradeniya, Sri Lanka
  • National Education Scholarship of Sri Lanka: (May 1997 to August 1985), for high school and undergraduate studies

Selected Peer-Reviewed Publications (in chronological order)

  1. J.J. Loor, A.B. Bandara, and J.H. Herbein. 2002. Characterization of 18:1 and 18:2 isomers produced during microbial biohydrogenation of unsaturated fatty acids from canola and soya bean oil in the rumen of lactating cows. Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition (Berl). 86(11-12):422-432.
  2. Bandara, A.B., and M.B. Mahipala. 2002. Incidence of Brucellosis in Sri Lanka: an Overview. Veterinary Microbiology 90:197-207.
  3. Bandara, A.B.,M.L. Lawrence, H.P. Veit, and T.J. Inzana. 2003. Association of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae Capsular Polysaccharide with virulence in pigs. Infection and Immunity. 71(6):3320-3328.
  4. Bandara, A.B., and T.J. Inzana. 2003. Molecular investigation of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae virulence factors, diagnosis, and development of recombinant vaccines: a review. Recent Advances in Microbiology (India). 2:103-117.
  5. Bandara, A.B., N. Sriranganathan, G.G. Schurig, and S.M. Boyle. 2005. Putative outer membrane autotransporter protein influences survival of Brucella suis in BALB/c mice. Vet. Microbiol. 109(1-2):95-104.
  6. Bandara, A.B., N. Sriranganathan G.G. Schurig, and S.M. Boyle. 2005. Carboxyl-terminal protease regulates Brucella suis morphology in culture and persistence in macrophages and mice. J Bacteriol. 187(16):5767-5775.
  7. Bandara, A.B., Selem M.N., Jordan C.N., Lindsay D.S., Schurig G.G., Sriranganathan N. 2006. Brucella abortus Strain RB51 can be Used to Express Potentially Protective Antigens of Toxoplasma gondii. J Eukaryot Microbiol. 2006 Nov;53 Suppl 1:S166-8.
  8. Bandara, A.B., A.M. Contreras, A. Contreras-Rodriguez, A.M. Martins, V. Dobrean, S. Poff-Reichow, P. Rajasekaran, N. Sriranganathan, G.G. Schurig, and S.M. Boyle. Brucella suis Urease Encoded by ure-1 but not ure-2 is Necessary for Intestinal Infection of BALB/c Mice. BMC Microbiology 7:57-71.
  9. Owens DK, Alerding AB, Crosby KC, Bandara AB, Westwood JH, Winkel BS. Functional analysis of a predicted flavonol synthase gene family in Arabidopsis. Plant Physiol. 2008 May 8.
  10. Bandara, A.B., D. DeShazer, T.J. Inzana, N. Sriranganathan, G.G. Schurig and and S.M. Boyle. 2008. A disruption of ctpA encoding carboxy-terminal protease attenuates Burkholderia mallei and induces partial protection in CD-1 mice. Microb Pathog. 2008 Sep;45(3):207-16.
  11. Bandara, A.B., G.G. Schurig, N. Sriranganathan, and S.M. Boyle. The putative penicillin-binding proteins 1 and 2 are important for viability, growth and cell morphology of Brucella melitensis. Vet Microbiol. 2008 Aug 5.