DVM Curriculum and Course Information

DVM Curriculum at a Glance

Our DVM professional curriculum is designed to provide a balanced educational foundation for the varied opportunities available to the veterinary graduate. Our program is concerned not only with the normal anatomy and physiology of animals, but also with disease processes, clinical diagnosis, and medical management responsibilities that set the veterinary profession apart from other animal, biological, and zoological science professions.

Our goal is to educate veterinarians with a firm foundation of basic biomedical knowledge and with the ability to apply this information in a problem-solving setting in order to provide excellent patient care and to increase scientific knowledge for the benefit of animals, human beings, and the environment.

In 2016, we launched a new curriculum which combines the basic and applied sciences through integrated courses based on function.

  • The first two years are focused on developing core knowledge, skills, and attributes across the species and through integration of the basic and clinical sciences.
  • At the end of the second year, students enter clinics for the first time and complete five clinical rotations over the summer.
  • In the third year, students come back into the classroom to focus on an area of their interest through our five tracking options: Small Animal, Equine, Food Animal, Mixed Animal, and Public/Corporate.
  • Students finish the last nine months of the DVM program with 12 clinical rotations.

The curriculum is constantly monitored and reviewed by the college's Curriculum Committee; therefore, the curriculum is subject to change as needs and circumstances dictate.

» View the full DVM course table (PDF)

Tracking

We offer a unique tracking curriculum that enables students to focus on, or "track," their primary area of interest. Students will choose a track at the end of their first clinical rotations. This curriculum is intended to provide a core knowledge necessary for entry-level practice, regardless of discipline. The track options are:

Course Descriptions

First Year: Fall

Becoming a Professional I

The Becoming a Veterinary Professional stream will be comprised of three semesters of coursework, which aims to assist students in their personal and professional development throughout the year 1-2 curriculum. The stream comprises a wide range of professional competencies that are not addressed specifically in the scientific curriculum, including animal welfare, clinical communication skills, career opportunities within veterinary medicine, history of the profession, legislation, personal finance, personal skills, practice management, professional behavior, a reflective approach to personal and professional development, thinking skills, and other veterinary issues. Each of these topics will be revisited over the next two years with more complex material introduced each semester.

Normal Animal

This course will study normal individual behavior, social behavior, and management of domestic species in addition to normal domestic animal body structure and function, including skeletal and neuromuscular organization, along with body cavities and gross and radiographic anatomy of structures within those cavities. Additionally, foundational knowledge of cell structure, differentiation, and physiology, as well as pharmaceuticals that influence cellular physiology, will be highlighted. Clinical skills required for veterinarians will be included.

Dealing with Threats

This course will study bacterial, viral, parasitological, and toxicological agents of disease in domestic animals, as well as mechanisms of disease production. Also covered are immunological responses to infectious agents and immune-mediated diseases, in addition to pathological and clinic-pathological responses of domestic species to insult. Principles of epidemiological evaluation, diagnosis, treatment, control, and prevention of common threats to domestic species are also highlighted.

First Year: Spring

Moving

This course provides core knowledge, skills and attributes of a veterinary professional as they pertain to the musculoskeletal system. This course will cover common diseases of domestic animals that limit the functions of the musculoskeletal system. Other topics that are discussed are the diagnosis, treatment and control of these diseases, the side effects of pain, as well as pain management.

Sensing and Seeing

We will integrate the fundamental principles of anatomy, physiology and microanatomy of the nervous, ocular, and dermatological systems with common clinical diseases that limit the function of these systems in domestic species. Students will also be studying the treatment and control of diseases affecting these systems, as well as, being introduced to the fundamental principles of anesthesia.

Becoming a Professional II

The Becoming A Professional stream consists of 3 semesters of coursework which aims to assist students in their personal and professional development throughout the year 1-2 curriculum. The program comprises a wide range of professional competencies which are not addressed specifically in the scientific curriculum. These include, not in order of importance: animal welfare, clinical communication skills, career opportunities within veterinary medicine, history of the profession, legislation, personal finance, personal skills, practice management, professional behavior, a reflective approach to personal and professional development, thinking skills and a variety of other veterinary issues. Each of these topics will be revisited over the next two years with more complex material introduced each semester. The program will also introduce the student to the veterinary teaching hospital (VTH).

Second Year: Fall

Breathing and Circulating

This course is designed to study structure, function, and dysfunction of the cardiovascular, hemo-lymphatic, and respiratory systems, including gross, radiographic, and microscopic anatomy; pathogenesis, pathophysiology, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of common diseases; and general anesthesia of veterinary patients. Pass/Fail only. Prerequisites: VM8164, VM 8174, VM 8824

Eating and Eliminating

In this course, students learn the physiologic processes involved in the consumption, digestion, metabolism, and excretion of nutrients, drugs, and toxins. These studies will include clinical signs and pathophysiology of disorders of consumptive, digestive, absorptive, metabolic, endocrine, and excretory processes. This course also teaches the adequacy of common diets to meet nutrient needs of animals in various stages of life.

Second Year: Spring

The Next Generation

This course will cover the anatomy, physiology, pharmacology and medical aspects associated with conception, embryonic and fetal development, gestation, delivery, and lactation. Other topics that will be covered are neonatal development, disorders and management. Students will be given hands-on experience with surgical and medical management of fertility with experience performing canine ovariohysterectomy.

Healthy Populations

This course will focus on the principles of epidemiology, biosecurity, population dynamics, and preventive health management of populations. Since human and animal health interface within the environment, One Health concepts will be utilized to prepare students to the role of veterinarians in the diagnosis and prevention of zoonotic conditions, food security, food safety, food defense, meat hygiene, antimicrobial usage and prevention of antimicrobial resistance. Surgical and medical management of fertility including canine ovariohysterectomy will continue from the previous course, the Next Generation.

Becoming a Professional III

The Becoming A Professional stream consists of 3 semesters of coursework which aims to assist students in their personal and professional development throughout the year 1-2 curriculum. The program comprises a wide range of professional competencies which are not addressed specifically in the scientific curriculum. These include, not in order of importance: animal welfare, clinical communication skills, career opportunities within veterinary medicine, history of the profession, legislation, personal finance, personal skills, practice management, professional behavior, a reflective approach to personal and professional development, thinking skills and a variety of other veterinary issues. Each of these topics will be revisited over the next two years with more complex material introduced each semester. The program will also introduce the student to the veterinary teaching hospital (VTH).

Third Year: Fall

TRACKS

Beyond Private Practice: Veterinary Careers and Pathways

In this course, students will explore career opportunities in veterinary medicine outside of private clinical practice with a focus on pathways toward determining and pursuing a successful and personally fulfilling career choice. Recent data about the motivations for veterinarians to change career paths will be presented and growth as a professional will be explored.

Developing the Public Veterinary Practitioner

In this course, students will gain knowledge, skills, and abilities essential for the diverse field of veterinary public practice. These competencies will be developed by discussion and investigation within public practice topic areas such as disease surveillance, prevention, and control; preparedness and response for infectious disease outbreaks and natural disasters; animal welfare; risk analysis; and international veterinary capacity building. Topics will be discussed within the context of state and federal government agencies, industry, and clinical institutions (e.g., zoos, animal laboratory facilities, animal shelters). The course material is delivered through lectures and in-class group activities and presentations. Activities and presentations are designed to help students develop their skills and abilities in critical thinking, collaboration, verbal and written communication, and leadership. Additionally, students will participate in field labs that will allow them to apply their knowledge, skills, and abilities in a field setting.

Equine Clinical Practice: Breathing, Circulating and Moving

This course presents current and in-depth information about diseases that affect horses of all ages, excluding the neonatal foal. Focuses on diseases of the musculoskeletal, respiratory and cardiac systems.

Equine Clinical Practice: Breathing, Circulating and Moving Lab

This course is aligned with EQCPBCM lecture course and focuses on development of clinical techniques associated with diseases that affect the equine musculoskeletal, respiratory, and cardiovascular systems.

Equine Podiatry

This three-credit course provides advanced training in equine podiatry for veterinary students intending to see horses as a significant part of their veterinary practice. Students will learn anatomy, physiology, distal limb biomechanics, and farriery as they relate to preventative foot healthcare and management of lameness conditions.

Equine Problem Solving I

This course will cover many of the common diseases and issues seen by practicing equine veterinarians.

Equine Techniques

This laboratory-centered course will provide advanced training and experience in performing and interpreting techniques commonly used in equine practice. Specifically, the techniques learned and practiced in the course complement the material taught in Equine Medicine and Surgery I, which focuses on the musculoskeletal and respiratory systems.

Food Animal Clinical Pharmacology

This course will examine in detail the unique aspects of the use of drugs in food animals. Through the use of case discussions, students will gain a better understanding of the Animal Medicinal Drug Use Clarification Act (AMDUCA), Veterinary Feed Directive (VFD), and treatment protocols.

Food Animal Medicine and Surgery I

This course is intended to provide practical information that a first-year graduate would need in order to be proficient in diagnosing, medically and surgically treating, and preventing the common conditions observed in an ambulatory-type food animal practice. This course will focus on individual animal medicine and surgery, rather than production medicine. With these goals in mind, this course is designed for students who want to practice food animal medicine either in a food animal or mixed animal practice.

Food Animal Nutrition

In this course, students will learn to diagnose, treat, and prevent common metabolic diseases of food animals, in addition to evaluating and designing feed programs for all life stages of food animals, including maintenance, growth, production, and reproduction.

Food Animal Techniques

This course will give students the opportunity to attain the basic clinical skills needed for food animal practice. The course will consist of five lectures and nine laboratories. The lectures will provide a general overview, as well as the knowledge to understand and perform and/or explain the clinical techniques in the laboratory sessions. Some of the knowledge and skills will include cattle-handling, restraint techniques, beef quality assurance, physical examination, injections, castration, dehorning, diagnostic sampling, field necropsy, nerve blocks, tagging/implanting, and basic techniques for sheep and swine.

Food Animal Theriogenology

With emphasis on clinical aspects of reproductive management, this course presents the practice of theriogenology in a food animal or mixed animal practice. The course will include reproductive management for herds of food animal species, including cattle, sheep, goats, and swine.

Goat and Sheep Medicine

This course is an in-depth treatment of the health and management as well as the diseases of goats and sheep. In addition, production cycles, management concerns, routine preventative care, and management of traumatic, infectious, and toxic disease problems are covered.

Small Animal Dentistry

Together with expanding on basic concepts of small animal dentistry introduced in the core curriculum, this course will introduce more advanced concepts applicable to the small animal general practitioner. It will prepare the student for common types of cases seen in a practice setting and introduce the surgical and other skills necessary for proper treatment of dental disorders.

Small Animal Ophthalmology and Neurology

This course will recognize or describe the clinical features associated with common problems affecting the ophthalmic and neurological systems of dogs and cats.

Small Animal Surgical Diseases and Techniques

Focusing on clinical presentations of common small animal surgical diseases, this course teaches normal anatomy and physiology to clinical disorders, principles of surgery, and complications of surgical procedures. It includes selecting the most appropriate diagnostic testing to confirm or rule out surgical diseases and interpret test results. It also contains guidance on how to choose the most appropriate level of surgery for tumor excision or biopsy.

Small Animal Theriogenology

This course deals with the normal reproductive function and management in dogs and cats. Diagnosis and management of reproductive diseases are considered. Recent literature and advances in theriogenology and genetics will be included. Neonatology will be covered in depth.

Veterinarians in Public Policy

This course provides an overview of the formulation and implementation of public policy at the international, national, state, professional association (AVMA), and consumer level through legislation, regulation, guidance, and resolutions. In this course, students will examine the roles of science, law, politics, economics, societal values, and stakeholder influence in forging public policy. Students will also explore the moral and ethical dimensions of public policy making and participate in a role-playing exercise in situational ethics. This course utilizes case studies relevant to veterinary medicine to illustrate various aspects of policy making.

ELECTIVES

Compassionate End of Life Care

The purpose of this course is to provide a cohesive body of work to support students interested in understanding as much as they can about euthanasia. Upon completion the student will have completed the Companion Animal Euthanasia Training Academy (CAETA) and receive that distinction. Coursework topics include the history and societal impact of euthanasia, drug pharmacology, caregiver considerations, pre-euthanasia sedation protocols, euthanasia techniques, case reviews, and more.

Emerging Infectious Diseases

This course will apply fundamental terminology appropriately and explain concepts in emerging infectious diseases (detailing natural and human-origin reasons in the process), in addition to explaining basic concepts for the principles of transmission, pathogenesis, and clinical features of emerging bacterial, viral, parasitic, and zoonotic animal and human diseases, in addition to factors contributing to their emergence.

Equine Sports Medicine and Rehabilitation

This course will introduce students to the basic concepts within equine sports medicine, rehabilitation, and complementary medicine. Students will learn about examination and diagnosis of performance limiting musculoskeletal injuries and cardiorespiratory conditions in the athletic equine. Students will then be introduced to various therapeutic options for treatment of these injuries and will work through some example cases.

Ferret Medicine

This course seeks to provide veterinary students with the opportunity to become familiar with the veterinary care of companion-animal ferrets (pets only). Students are expected to have a basic understanding of medical concepts and skills for traditional small-animal species, which then can apply to ferrets. This course will allow students the opportunity to become familiar with common concepts of ferrets, including husbandry and preventative medicine, to gain knowledge in common disorders and diseases of this species, as well as diagnostic techniques of value and strategies for interpreting them. The course provides students the opportunity to attain entry to mid-level skills necessary to care for companion animal ferrets, common anesthetic protocols, and surgical techniques. A cadaver lab will be offered to practice common venipuncture techniques, catheter and endotracheal tube placement, and necropsy.

Food Animal Product Safety

This course will provide the history, development, and enforcement of laws and regulations that affect the food animal processing industry and consumers, in addition to a comprehensive approach to microbiological and physical foodborne hazard identification, testing, and sampling. Moreover, the course will highlight foodborne hazard prevention and control, including Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points systems. Prerequisite: third year standing in DVM curriculum. (2H, 2C)

Functional Morphology of Birds

This course will identify birds as relatively close phylogenetic relatives of reptiles, as well as list structural features of modern birds that are both shared with and distinct from reptiles.

Fundamentals of Veterinary Diagnostics

In this course students will learn to compare the use and usefulness of current and emerging diagnostic tests. Describe the difference between point-of-care (bedside) testing and send-out-testing and identify scenarios in which each would be the diagnostic test of choice. Differentiate between analytic and diagnostic test validation. Differentiate between accredited and non-accredited laboratories, describe the importance of accreditation to clinicians, and evaluate the accredited veterinary diagnostic laboratories. Select appropriate diagnostic tests for a given clinical scenario or gross lesion, justify your choice of diagnostic test and correctly submit samples to either in-hospital or external laboratories. Interpret diagnostic test results for a given clinical scenario or gross lesion.

Infection Control and Prevention

The course will provide assessment, policies, and procedures for control and prevention of infectious diseases in communities and populations. Topics covered will include source, transmission mode, and local community to international dissemination of infectious disease agents; antimicrobial and chemical resistance; vaccine development, safety, and coverage; community- and hospital-based needs and interventions; and regulatory frameworks. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. (3H, 3C)

Introduction to Statistics in Biomedical Research

This course will cover design of studies in veterinary-related clinical and epidemiologic research, planning, and implementation of experimental and survey data collection, management and analysis of data, and interpretation and presentation of results.

Neglected and Emerging Infectious Diseases

This course promotes an understanding of the concept of neglected diseases and their association with poverty and health inequities, the critical factors for emergence/re-emergence of infectious diseases, and the challenges and implications for disease control, eradication, and response.

Principles of Infectious Diseases

This course surveys the basic principles of infectious diseases important in local, national, and global public health. This course covers parasitic, fungal, bacterial and viral pathogens and the mechanisms by which they cause disease, as well as the host’s immune response to those pathogens.

Reptile Medicine and Surgery

The aim of this course is to provide a solid foundation in reptile husbandry, medicine, and surgery. There will be emphasis on anatomical differences between the four main groups of reptiles: chelonians, lizards, crocodilians, and snakes. In this course students will compare and contrast reptiles with other more common species from a biological, anatomical, and husbandry perspective. Diagnostic tests, hospital care, anesthesia, analgesia, and critical care will be covered along with surgery and treatment of commonly occurring diseases and injuries. The emphasis of this course will be on captive reptile species.

Small Animal Physical Rehabilitation and Complementary Medicine

This special topics course will cover the basic concepts of physical rehabilitation, conditioning, and complementary therapy in small animals. Students will be introduced to various therapeutic options to include (but not limited to) therapeutic and conditioning exercises, acupuncture, photobiomodulation, electrical stimulation, therapeutic ultrasound, and nutrition/nutraceuticals.

Topics in Animal-Human Relationships

The goal of this course is to provide a broad view of the current, evidence-based information about how animals and humans share the living world.

Traditional Chinese Veterinary Medicine

This course will cover the fundamental theories of traditional Chinese veterinary medicine (TCVM). Students will learn how patients are assessed and diagnosed from a TCVM standpoint. Emphasis will be placed on theory of disease and diagnostic techniques. Treatment techniques will not be covered. Laboratories will allow students to practice diagnostic techniques in dogs and horses.

Veterinary Practice Business Management

Business management, marketing, and entrepreneurship concepts will be covered in detail in this course. It will provide students with an understanding of the requirements, risks, and rewards of veterinary practice ownership and enable students to assess and analyze business problems, as well as develop creative solutions.

Zoo Mammal Comparative Physiology

This course is designed for students who have a foundation in anatomy and physiology to use their knowledge and skills to apply to non-domestic species of mammals. It will provide a foundational knowledge of the life histories and associated functional morphological adaptations of various taxonomic groups within the Class Mammalia.

Third Year: Spring

TRACKS

Special Topics in Equine Clinical Practice

This course presents current and in-depth information about diseases that affect horses of all ages, excluding the neonatal foal. Areas covered include anesthesiology, ophthalmology, neurology, gastroenterology, nephrology, cutaneous neoplasia and wound healing, castration, and preventive medicine.

Special Topics in Equine Clinical Practice Lab

This course is aligned with the fall Equine Clinical Practice: Breathing, Circulating and Moving, and focuses on development of clinical techniques associated with ophthalmology, neurology, gastroenterology, dentistry, dermatology, wound healing, castration, and preventive medicine.

Special Topics EQ Problem Solving

This course will cover many of the common diseases and issues seen by practicing equine veterinarians. Some topics of discussion will include, but not limited to, incoordination, colic, neurologic diseases, skin mass, dentistry, alopecia, fever, and diagnostic imaging.

The Next Equid

This course will expand upon the equine knowledge obtained in The Next Generation. It will focus on learning the aspects of equine theriogenology and foal care that are applicable to primary care equine practice.

EQ Diagnostic Techniques for Digestive Nervous and Integumentary Systems

This laboratory-centered course will provide advanced training and experience in performing and interpreting techniques commonly used in equine practice. Specifically, the techniques learned and practiced in the course complement the material taught in the Equine Medicine and Surgery 2 and Equine Problem Solving 2 courses.

Equine Nutrition

The Equine Nutrition course is designed to develop day one veterinary competency in equine nutrition. How should the healthy horse be fed? How should the horse with a nutrition-sensitive health condition be fed? After completing this course, students will be able to evaluate and design rations for horses of varying physiologic and pathophysiologic statuses.

Food Animal Population Medicine

This course presents the concepts of production diseases at the herd level which includes the diagnostic, therapeutic, and prevention techniques that are applied at the herd level rather than the individual animal.

FA Clinical Reproduction

This course presents the practice of clinical reproductive techniques in a food animal or mixed animal practice. The course will include demonstration and performance of techniques for evaluation of clinical reproduction for individual animals in herds of food animal species including cattle, sheep, goats, and swine. Emphasis is on clinical techniques such as ultrasonography of the reproductive tract of males and females, breeding soundness evaluations of bulls, pregnancy evaluation of the bovine reproductive tract, as well as dystocia and fetotomy techniques in the bovine.

Advanced Dairy

This course will examine in detail dairy production, medicine, and management. Surgical experience in Displaced Abomasum repair will also be done.

Advanced Beef

This course will examine in detail beef production, medicine, and management. Surgical experience in caesarian section will also occur.

Food Animal Problem Solving

In this course, students will be learn to identify common medical problems of food animals, including disorders/diseases of reproduction, the mammary gland, metabolism, nutrition, the musculoskeletal system, the gastrointestinal system, the respiratory system, the hemolymphatic system, and the neurologic system, formulate a differential diagnosis list for common clinical food animal conditions, recommend appropriate diagnostic tests and interpret test results, recommend a therapeutic regimen and monitoring system to evaluate success of treatment, establish an economically-based control/prevention protocol, determine herd implications of common medical problems, and read and evaluate published, peer-reviewed articles to determine implications on diagnosis and treatment options.

Small Animal Oncology

This course is a comprehensive study on the approach, pathophysiology, diagnosis, staging, and management of cancer in small animals

Small Animal Emergency Medicine

This course provides current information on major aspects of small animal emergency medicine and critical care. Topics include management of shock, oxygenation, blood pressure management, and CPR as well as emergent treatment of systemic disease, traumatic injuries and toxicological emergencies. Techniques including bandaging, central line placement, centesis, and tracheostomy are discussed and performed in a laboratory setting.

Small Animal Medicine

This course will instruct students, in regards to specific disorders of the endocrine, gastrointestinal, hepatobiliary, hematologic, urinary, and respiratory systems of dogs and cats, to be able to describe the pathophysiological mechanisms, identify and associate abnormal clinical signs and physical examination findings, identify and formulate a list of medical problems, formulate a list of prioritized differential diagnoses for those problems, develop an appropriate diagnostic plan, analyze and interpret diagnostic test results, and design an appropriate therapeutic and monitoring plan.

SA Nutrition

The Small Animal Nutrition course is designed to develop day one veterinary competency in small animal nutrition. How should the healthy cat/dog be fed? How should the cat/dog with a nutrition-sensitive health condition be fed? After completing this course, students will be able to evaluate and design diets for cats/dogs of varying physiologic and pathophysiologic statuses.

Problem Solving in Public and Corporate Veterinary Practice

This course will present public and corporate veterinary practice case studies in a problem-oriented format. Due to the breadth of public veterinary practice, a diversity of cases will be presented representing real situations that veterinarians in public practice have had to resolve or manage. Cases will vary from year to year depending on class interest and speaker availability. The course will be oriented towards developing critical thinking skills, recognizing the perspectives that must be considered, and understanding the broad, sometimes national and international impacts of decision making. Communication skills will also be emphasized.

ELECTIVES

Advanced Histopathology

In this course students will learn about the process for preparation of histologic slides from tissues derived at necropsy and biopsy and identify processing artifacts in tissues, to identify and describe cellular and tissue changes in response to injury, to identify and describe infectious organisms in tissue sections using conventional and special stains, to identify and describe epithelial, mesenchymal, and round cell neoplasms, to identify and describe microscopic lesions in multiple tissues a wide variety of species, and how to write and interpret histologic descriptions. Students will also learn about diseases due to viruses, bacteria, fungi, helminths & protozoa. Immunopathology will also be taught.

Applied Veterinary Diagnostics

This course will focus on interpretation of laboratory data and imaging in common domestic species, with an emphasis on relating abnormal diagnostic results to gross lesions and disease pathogenesis. The majority of this course will be administered using a mixture of traditional lectures and case-based learning sessions.

Aquatic Medicine

This course will teach etiology, diagnosis, pathology, pathogenesis, chemotherapy, control and management of infectious and non-infectious diseases of aquatic organisms, especially pertaining to cultured food, ornamental and tropical fish. Hands on lab experience with water quality evaluation, non-lethal and lethal diagnostic techniques, and the identification of common pathogenic organisms.

Avian Medicine and Surgery

This course will introduce students to the common diseases that affect pet birds. Students will be expected to apply problem solving / critical thinking skills to construct (reverse engineer) clinical presentations from pathological findings. Development of differential diagnosis lists and diagnostic plans will be emphasized. Approaches to treatment, control and prevention of will be discussed.

Care Forward

In this course students will learn to produce personal and professional goals to create life balance, identify potential stressors in both work and personal life, construct wellness strategies, including relationships, self-care, mindfulness-based stress reduction and personal interests, identify reasons for practice burnout and develop strategies to prevent burnout, discover the importance of the humanities in the practice of veterinary medicine.

Clinical Reptile Medicine

The aim of this course is to provide a good understanding of reptile husbandry, medicine, and surgery. There will be emphasis on anatomical differences between the four main groups of reptiles: chelonians, lizards, crocodilians, and snakes. This course will help students to understand the differences between reptiles and other more common species in a biological, anatomical, and husbandry sense. Diagnostics, hospital care, anesthesia, analgesia, and critical will be covered, along with diagnostics, surgery, and treatment of commonly occurring diseases and injuries. The emphasis of this course will be on captive reptile species mostly.

Decision Making in Veterinary Pharmacology

In this course, students will learn to recall the major classes of antimicrobial drugs, their mechanism of action, adverse effects, drug interactions and appropriate clinical use, recall the major classes of analgesic drugs, their mechanism of action, adverse effects, drug interactions and appropriate clinical use, recall the major classes of anti-parasitic drugs, their mechanism of action, adverse effects, drug interactions and appropriate clinical use, apply knowledge of antimicrobials and analgesic drugs to decide on a therapeutic course for specific case examples, apply knowledge of anti-parasitic drugs to decide on a prophylactic course for specific animals, discuss the possible effects of co-morbidities on the pharmacokinetics and dosage regimens in patients and discuss possible drug-drug interactions in animals with multiple co-morbidities.

Descriptive Embryology

In this course, students will learn to describe the process of early embryologic development, from cleavage through the establishment of the three primary germ layers, to list the major derivatives of each of the three primary germ layers in terms of what general types of tissues and organ systems originate with each, to characterize the normal development of the following organ systems: extraembryonic membranes and fluids; central and peripheral nervous systems; pharyngeal region; skeletal system; muscle in general (skeletal, cardiac, and smooth); septum transversum and diaphragm; gastrointestinal system; respiratory system (upper and lower); urinary system; reproductive system including external genitalia, to define teratogenesis and list common teratogens encountered in veterinary medicine; relate the general outcomes of embryonic/fetal insult during the pre-differentiation, embryonic, and fetal periods to the relevant developmental stage, to distinguish between normal and abnormal twinning in terms of mechanisms producing the twins; identify commonly-seen forms of abnormal twinning in veterinary medicine and characterize the flaw in the normal developmental process that produced the anomaly, to define “congenital anomaly” and characterize the breadth of congenital defects, and to recognize and characterize the general anomalies in development leading to various congenital defects likely to be seen in both small animal and large animal practice.

Diseases of Poultry

This course teaches principles of poultry health. Students will gain knowledge of avian (poultry) clinical anatomy and physiology, nutrition, basic management, clinical signs of common diseases/disorders, generation of differential diagnoses lists, development of diagnostic plans, treatment, control, and prevention strategies. The course stresses critical thinking and problem solving.

Environmental Health

The purpose of this course is to provide an overview of environmental health by answering two fundamental questions: How does the environment affect human health? How do we purposefully design environmental policies to optimize human health? This course will examine how chemical, biological, and physical agents found in the natural and manmade environment affect our health. The course will cover the main fields of environmental health sciences including toxicology, exposure science (including routes through air, water, and food media), environmental and occupational epidemiology, and risk assessment. The course will also explore how municipal, state, federal and international agencies design, implement and evaluate the success of environmental and occupational policies, taking into consideration social and economic factors.

Issues Vet Public Health

The World Health Organization defines Veterinary Public Health as "the sum of all contributions to the physical, mental and social well-being of humans through an understanding and application of veterinary science." In this course, students will investigate a series of veterinary public health topics, through a combination of pre-class readings, in-class lectures, discussions and activities, and review of recent journal articles relevant to the topics discussed. In addition, students will participate in an in-class exercise using the CDC’s Zoonotic Disease Prioritization Tool, which is currently used by Ministries of Health and Agriculture around the world as part of the Global Health Security Agenda. This course will allow students to apply their veterinary knowledge within the context of current domestic and global public health problems.

Pocket Pet Medicine

This course will provide basic information on the proper care and management of a variety of companion exotic species (i.e., rats, mice, gerbils, hamsters, guinea pigs, chinchillas, rabbits, ferrets, sugar gliders, and hedgehogs) commonly seen in veterinary practice. Topics will cover common medical problems, including major infectious diseases, non-infectious problems, nutritional problems, and trauma. Diagnostic approaches, medical management, treatments, and vaccination protocols will be presented when appropriate.

Reproductive Pathology

In this course, students will learn to recognize major gross lesions of the reproductive tract of domesticated animals, develop morphologic diagnoses for lesions of reproductive organs of domesticated animals, and to correlate lesions of reproductive organs with their prognosis and reproductive function.

Small Animal Behavioral Medicine

This course provides an introduction to canine and feline behavior medicine. Topics include ontogeny of behavior, basic obedience and housetraining, aggression, anxiety, compulsive disorders, elimination problems, psychopharmacology, and other common behavior problems encountered in general practice.

Veterinary Cytopathology

In this course, students will microscopically review and discuss cytological samples from common neoplastic, inflammatory, and infectious disorders.

Wildlife Medicine

This course will present the basics of wildlife medicine and rehabilitation including the regulations and ethics covering the rehabilitation and release of native wildlife, major infectious diseases, emerging and zoonotic diseases, parasites, toxicities, injuries and other problems of wildlife. Common treatments, methods and equipment used to care for and rehabilitate these animals will be presented. Species covered will include both native mammals and birds (waterfowl, songbirds, and raptors).

Course Syllabi

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